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'The pandemic has made me reconsider a career in music' - How COVID-19 has affected our music students

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Artist Management Services have today published their report on how music students have been affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.  Having surveyed hundreds of students on a wide range of music-related courses, AMS have presented their findings in this detailed report, which highlights some of the key concerns. As well as the immediate disruption to learning that has similarly affected the rest of the education system, the results of the survey reveal destroyed confidence in the music industry and serious concerns about future employability.  Artist Management Services' Communications Director, Adam Cable, spoke about the report and its findings: "The results made for dire reading. It's clear, perhaps unsurprisingly, that the pandemic has brought about a real shift in priorities for students. There's more anxiety about career prospects and job security - we've even had conversations with students who are in the process of changing courses or giving up on music altoget

Artist Management Services Supports Business School's £50 Challenge

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We are delighted to share the news that we as a business are supporting a group of selected students from Nottingham Trent University, in collaboration with the Institute of Directors. Every year, the university nominates a section of their students to become student members of the IoD, giving them access to additional support, a mentoring programme and a number of business-specific events designed to boost their real-world experience.  One such event is the £50 Challenge, where students are put into teams and are tasked with turning £50 into as much profit as possible in a set amount of time, with money raised going to charity. The challenge is done in partnership with the students' IoD mentors; Artist Management's CEO, Ben Marshall, spoke about how excited he is to be taking on a mentoring role this year:  "Both as a business and as individuals, we are passionate about seeing young people succeed. The £50 Challenge is a great opportunity for students, as not only does it

The Hidden Symptom of Streaming

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The cost of online music streaming services to artists has been hotly debated in recent weeks. Key figures from the industry have questioned the morality of streaming giants like Spotify and Apple Music, suggesting that musicians who make their work available on these platforms do not get a fair price per listen.  "Access to unlimited music is fast becoming an expectation; it's almost a commodity. The days of paying for an album or an individual song are gone in the majority of people's eyes," said Matthew Hunt, Artist Management's Head of Production. "To have restrictions to music taken away is fantastic, but it doesn't come without side-effects."  As well as the meagre pay-outs, artists have also criticised streaming providers for not doing enough to promote new music, opting instead to make recommendations to listeners that contain mostly household names and 'old-school classics'.  "A lot of my Spotify recommendations are singers and

Not Your Usual Nativity!

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It might seem like a lifetime ago, but only one month ago, people celebrated a very different kind of Christmas. COVID-19 restrictions, put into effect by the UK government, allowed families a very limited amount of time to spend time together to enjoy the festivities with some semblance of normality. In the lead up to Christmas Day, it became abundantly clear for primary schools that the usual winter term traditions – namely, the much-anticipated Christmas nativity, performed by the schools' younger children - would not be able to go ahead as planned.  The scene is set - ready for filming to commence! This was certainly the case for Linby cum Papplewick Primary School, a village school in Nottingham, local to Artist Management Services. With staff already stretched with the additional workload of having to manage and maintain a safe learning environment for their pupils, the team started to think about ways they might be able to help. For parents, seeing their child perform in the

Glastonbury Canned: Is festival season now nothing more than a pipe dream?

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The world reacted with dismay, but with little surprise, at the news yesterday afternoon that the world-famous Glastonbury festival will be cancelled due to the impact of COVID-19. Festival organisers, Michael and Emily Eavis, made a statement confirming the news (below), making it the second year in a row that plans for the much-loved music and arts festival have been abandoned. Fans and musicians alike have expressed disappointment but understanding.  “In spite of our efforts to move Heaven & Earth, it has become clear that we simply will not be able to make the Festival happen this year,” the Eavises said. “We are so sorry to let you all down.” Organisers have guaranteed the chance to buy tickets for the event in 2022 to people successful in securing tickets for this year through a £50 deposit. The event was due to occur between the 23rd and 27th of June; rumours regarding the line-up were already doing the rounds on social media.  MP Julian Knight, who is chairing the DCMS comm

Brexit and touring in the EU: A Simple Explainer

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The government has come under criticism this week for reportedly rejecting a deal with the European Union which would have seen musicians permitted visa-free touring, potentially meaning a lot of additional expense and hassle for performers looking to take their work around the continent. Here's what we know so far.  • Free movement of people between the UK and EU ended on 1st January with Britain's withdrawal from the European Union officially coming into effect. Of course, travel is still possible, but not in the same fashion as was allowed previously. Musicians and their technical crews face new rules, additional costs and extensive paperwork, especially if moving between countries.  • It was initially reported by The Independent that Brussels was the culprit for the breakdown in negotiations for easy touring. However, since then, an 'EU source' has disputed this claim, arguing instead that the UK is responsible for the failure to reach an agreement, reportedly r

Spotify Wrapped 2020: Soundtrack to the End of the World

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If one thing can be unanimously agreed upon by everyone, barring the likes of Jeff Bezos and investors in Pfizer, 2020 has been one hell of a ride; emphasis on the 'hell'. What a brief bit of respite from the doom and gloom it was when, early this morning, Spotify users awoke to find their smartphone apps telling them that their personal Spotify Wrapped was now available to watch: a personalised review of your year-long listening habits, favourite tracks and most-listened-to artists. A phenomenon that flew under the radar in years gone by, the now hotly anticipated annual event has been the most consistently talked about and tagged phrase across social media today. It's a bit of fun ultimately. Wrapped will tell you quirky factoids like which new genres you've explored, how many hours of your life you've forfeited to conspiracy theory podcasts and how you're in the top 0.5% of global Frozen II soundtrack listeners thanks to car rides with your two-year-old. Spot